The elephant in the room. Persistent pain and neurocognitive problems.

Moving has always scared me.

I've never been in full control of my body, for some reason I don't know exactly, it's always been stumbling, comes after the mind, gets filled with anxiety, from fear of falling. My diversity in this sense has always weighed on me. A diversity inside, because outside there was nothing different. There is nothing.

Still, there is so much different.

Who knows from outside what you think of me. What do you see. Who do you see.

From inside, you often feel a lot of fatigue. If a certain thing requires a certain amount of effort for a “standard” person, in general I have to do twice as much, with my body and my head.

The inability to control the body, which has dramatically intertwined with persistent pain, inevitably led me to focus on the brain. Read, study, learn, know. Here, my definition as a person, for years, came from there.

I have read many reviews that tell me, my experience, the experience of the symptoms of a person with persistent pain.

A Systematic Review is an instrument of scientific research whose aim is to summarize data on a certain topic, with attention to the sources, which must be highly referenced, to identify all the evidence relating to a specific scientific question.

Finding yourself in Review on persistent pain, on Central Sensitization, always has a certain effect.

Finding yourself thinking about the neurocognitive problems that persistent pain brings after reading a review, however, was excruciating for me.

I have always known (and then read) that persistent pain causes cognitive problems. Finding written black on white, has something devastating: if persistent pain does not matter to anyone, the cognitive problems that pain brings with it, it matters even less, and yet they are there, elephants in a room, which they become, for those who judge you or make you a diagnosis, if you are lukcy, "stressed", or one with a bad slacker attitude if you are not.

This is not a path made of full stops. It is constantly evolving. Because I am evolving. Persistent pain, due to its multidimensional essence, requires me to tell you my own business.

Persistent pain is not something that you are here, he is there and in the meantime you can continue to have your life. He is hugging you tightly, to the point that you no longer understand who you are and who he is.

Well. Now that we are at the point where we understand a little more who I am, because the bulk of the pain has been removed and we can see that I am not a pathological plaintive, which languishes on the sofa waiting for her inexorable fate (that is, what the world evidently believed I was), I can try to deal with this somewhat complicated topic, without feeling like a perfect idiot.

Since 2003, the year in which my symptoms have definitely worsened, I have also started to experience cognitive problems. And this, for a person who identified himself with his "brain", was simply tremendous.

Let me explain: I started having short-term memory problems, the feeling that "I was missing words", of learning, of attention, an incredible slowdown in the speed of information processing. I lived with a perpetual sense of confusion. Health professionals told me I was anxious and stressed. I was afraid of having a dementia principle. In the meantime, my self-esteem was falling apart, and my life with her.

It is not easy to find yourself unable at any moment. Put your ambition aside, abandon yourself to a body and a brain (above all) that do not correspond to you. It means not recognizing yourself anymore, not knowing what to expect, having no plans.

Losing my brain was almost worse to me than losing my body. I've always been an intellectual, not an athlete. Finding myself unable to think was traumatic, frightening and painful. But I "was anxious" and in short, it was right that I stayed in the social rear, because with my way of being, so fickle, I was useful to the world as a wedding favor.

I thought that the anxiety (i.e. what they diagnosed me as anxiety, but I later discovered to be perceptual problems caused by the migraine) and the feeling of incompetence that came with it, had made me lose the ability to be mentally productive (I'm not considering the pain itself, of course). Instead I suffered from persistent pain.

Then I read a few things. With seventeen years of delay.

The basic cognitive processes of the human being are: perception, attention, memory, language and executive functions. All these functions are closely linked to decision-making and the emotional sphere. Each cognitive ability can involve a specific area of ​​the brain or be the result of a network of connections between different brain areas.

People living with chronic pain commonly have cognitive difficulties affecting short-term memory, attention, speed of information processing, speed of psychomotor reaction, higher-order skills such as planning and reasoning, mental ability to easily switch from one task to another, the ability to solve problems.

Although cognitive symptoms are not the primary concern of patients with persistent pain, they can be significantly debilitating and research suggests that it is worth tackling them.

First, cognitive inefficiencies can impact patients' response to treatment. Most of the therapies offered for the treatment of chronic pain require cognitive effort on the part of patients to manage their mood and to understand, remember and complete physiotherapy exercises.

Several mechanisms have been identified that can influence the cognitive abilities of people with persistent pain.

The first mechanism refers to the "limited resource theory", whereby the capacities, in terms of brain processing resources, are preferably assigned to the treatment of pain signals, due to their high biological importance, thus interrupting others cognitive processes.

The second mechanism is maladaptive plasticity. Over time, persistent nociceptive signals lead to structural and neurochemical changes in the nervous system. Changes in gray matter can be observed in the brain of people with chronic pain. These morphological and neurochemical changes that occur in the brain may be partially responsible for the cognitive changes that are commonly observed.

Furthermore, the contribution of secondary factors such as insomnia, fatigue, medications and mood disorders to the experience of cognitive difficulties should be considered, although further controlled studies are needed to clarify the contributions of each factor.

A promising recent development in this field of research is on the possibility of inversion of maladaptive plasticity, with the resolution of pain.

Imaging and neurocognitive studies have shown that pain resolution leads to normalization of cortical thickness and a reduction in cognitive deficit, however it is certainly necessary to understand what can be done to improve cognitive functions, despite the pain.

Certainly educating the patient about the causes and the maintenance of his deficits can be incredibly therapeutic in itself, it allows to legitimize his concerns and to help him understand the reasons for his cognitive difficulties.

After explaining to the patient the probable causes of the cognitive difficulties, the next logical step is to find together ways to better address them, using compensatory strategies. The purpose of compensatory strategies for cognitive impairment is not to repair the deficit per se. Rather, the focus is on reducing the disabilities that can result from those cognitive difficulties.

Compensation strategies may for example include the use of external memory cues, such as a diary or calendar for appointments, a pill organizer so that the correct medications are taken each day, alarms to keep track of time, and others electronic memory aids.

Compensation strategies have great potential and many can be found based on the patient's specific goals.

There is the possibility of carrying out interventions that stimulate altered or underutilized functions, to build or repair neuronal connections through neuroplasticity. For example, if a patient experiences short-term memory problems that cause him to lose the thread of the speech, a "restorative" approach could be to undertake training on memory.

Another solution available can be CBT psychotherapy, which teaches how to manage pain, with positive effects also on neurocognitive functions.

Lastly, movement has neuroprotective effects and improves cognitive function.

The best solution to cognitive problems of people with persistent pain is likely to involve a combination of approaches, individually tailored to the patient's needs based on their profile. There are certainly many translation possibilities in practice.

Everything should start from the recognition of persistent pain as a serious, pervasive, multifactorial problem. The solutions are there. Unfortunately, they seem distant horizons for many. Of course, it is not a valid reason to give up.

What do I do now to deal with all that? I use compensation strategies and try to take it ironically, but it's not easy. It is not easy not to have words, not to remember things, to struggle to move from one thought to another. And this is still tremendously difficult to accept.

But I believe in neuroplasticity and, basically, my path to change my maladaptive plasticity has only just begun. With the body, with that treacherous body that went away on its own, it went well.

Little by little, the brain will also change. He has already done so, after all. And if I lose my words, I can always laugh about it (even if it's not exactly easy for Miss Perfection).

 

Sources:

Optimizing Cognitive Function in Persons With Chronic Pain Katharine S. Baker, BPsySc (Hons), Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis, PhD, Stephen J. Gibson, PhD, and Melita J. Giummarra, PhD Clinical Journal of Pain

 

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Kinesiophobia state of mind

Kinesiophobia State of Mind.

Once yes. Phobia. Fear of movement. Chronic fear of movement. I've always had it. From what memory I have.

Kinesiophobia is defined as excessive, irrational, and debilitating fear of physical movement and activity resulting from a feeling of vulnerability due to a painful injury or repeated injury. Here. I have always had motor difficulties (the sisters in kindergarten did not help), which did nothing but get worse at school, where nobody cared about my fatigue, on the contrary: I found myself overwhelmed by a flow of kids, whose skills motor skills were certainly superior to mine and I was asked to adapt to their standard, without having the means, with catastrophic results. So for me, moving and hurting myself was the norm. I started having the fear of physical education classes, during which, in junior high, I remedied the whiplash injury that caused the lesion that causes the occipital neuralgia, I broke a couple of flexor tendons of the fingers and other various figures of 💩 that I'm not telling (not to mention the apocalyptic fall that paved the way for persistent pain, but that was accidental).

I believe there is little wonder that it has become kinesiophobic. Somehow, my body has always been a traitor. It was normal for me to choose the brain. It was certainly more reliable.

Obviously, over the years, my kinesiophobia has nurtured and made strong of "don't move", which the various health professionals have offered me. I was happy that I was told not to move. The fact is that kinesiophobia is related to chronic pain. Understanding this relationship can be difficult, but it is important in addressing the "dysfunctions" that can "cause the pain cycle". To sum up, the belief that something is wrong with our body, and the belief that avoiding exercise will prevent an increase in pain, lead to a vicious cycle involving avoidance of movement or any activity that could (could, in theory, in our opinion) cause pain or injury. Over time, the inactivity that results from this fear leads to psychophysical consequences such as muscle wasting, loss of mobility, and an altered response to painful stimuli and behavioral changes, which can contribute to perpetuating the pain. In short, a mess: we trap ourselves (unknowingly) even better in the problem.

Immersed in my kinesiophobia, when Luca showed up saying that I had to move to manage the pain, I thought he was crazy (sorry). Because it would have hurt, because I was not able. And it didn't happen that way. What happened was that in my journey I had people who welcomed me. They listened to my fears and, one kg after another, they helped me make it.

So, when I mirror myself, with a barbell on my shoulders, and I see all the intelligence of my body, which only needed its time, not to be overwhelmed by the flow of "others", I don't just feel free from pain, but also from fear and insecurity. And I firmly believe that the modicum of self-esteem that I managed to recover has passed and passes through the tool that I felt less congenial: my body.

My body, which I look more and more astonished.

 

Sources:
Butler DS, Moseley GL. Explain pain. Adelaide: Noigroup Publications; 2015
Crombez G, Vlaeyen JW, Heuts PH, Lysens R. Pain-related fear is more disabling than pain itself: evidence on the role of pain-related fear in chronic back pain disability. Pain 1999; 80 (1): 329 – 339. doi: 10.1016 / 0304-s3959 (98) 00229-2.
Lethem J, Slade P, Troup J, Bentley G. Outline of a fear-avoidance model of exaggerated pain perception — I. Behavior Research and Therapy 1983; 21 (4): 401 – 408. doi: 10.1016 / 0005-7967 (83) 90009-8.
Neblett R, Hartzell M, Mayer T, Bradford E, Gatchel R. Establishing clinically meaningful levels for the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK-13). Eur J Pain European Journal of Pain 2015; 20 (5): 1 – 10. doi: 10.1002 / ejp.795.

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