Kinesiophobia state of mind

Kinesiophobia State of Mind.

Once yes. Phobia. Fear of movement. Chronic fear of movement. I've always had it. From what memory I have.

Kinesiophobia is defined as excessive, irrational, and debilitating fear of physical movement and activity resulting from a feeling of vulnerability due to a painful injury or repeated injury. Here. I have always had motor difficulties (the sisters in kindergarten did not help), which did nothing but get worse at school, where nobody cared about my fatigue, on the contrary: I found myself overwhelmed by a flow of kids, whose skills motor skills were certainly superior to mine and I was asked to adapt to their standard, without having the means, with catastrophic results. So for me, moving and hurting myself was the norm. I started having the fear of physical education classes, during which, in junior high, I remedied the whiplash injury that caused the lesion that causes the occipital neuralgia, I broke a couple of flexor tendons of the fingers and other various figures of 💩 that I'm not telling (not to mention the apocalyptic fall that paved the way for persistent pain, but that was accidental).

I believe there is little wonder that it has become kinesiophobic. Somehow, my body has always been a traitor. It was normal for me to choose the brain. It was certainly more reliable.

Obviously, over the years, my kinesiophobia has nurtured and made strong of "don't move", which the various health professionals have offered me. I was happy that I was told not to move. The fact is that kinesiophobia is related to chronic pain. Understanding this relationship can be difficult, but it is important in addressing the "dysfunctions" that can "cause the pain cycle". To sum up, the belief that something is wrong with our body, and the belief that avoiding exercise will prevent an increase in pain, lead to a vicious cycle involving avoidance of movement or any activity that could (could, in theory, in our opinion) cause pain or injury. Over time, the inactivity that results from this fear leads to psychophysical consequences such as muscle wasting, loss of mobility, and an altered response to painful stimuli and behavioral changes, which can contribute to perpetuating the pain. In short, a mess: we trap ourselves (unknowingly) even better in the problem.

Immersed in my kinesiophobia, when Luca showed up saying that I had to move to manage the pain, I thought he was crazy (sorry). Because it would have hurt, because I was not able. And it didn't happen that way. What happened was that in my journey I had people who welcomed me. They listened to my fears and, one kg after another, they helped me make it.

So, when I mirror myself, with a barbell on my shoulders, and I see all the intelligence of my body, which only needed its time, not to be overwhelmed by the flow of "others", I don't just feel free from pain, but also from fear and insecurity. And I firmly believe that the modicum of self-esteem that I managed to recover has passed and passes through the tool that I felt less congenial: my body.

My body, which I look more and more astonished.

 

Sources:
Butler DS, Moseley GL. Explain pain. Adelaide: Noigroup Publications; 2015
Crombez G, Vlaeyen JW, Heuts PH, Lysens R. Pain-related fear is more disabling than pain itself: evidence on the role of pain-related fear in chronic back pain disability. Pain 1999; 80 (1): 329 – 339. doi: 10.1016 / 0304-s3959 (98) 00229-2.
Lethem J, Slade P, Troup J, Bentley G. Outline of a fear-avoidance model of exaggerated pain perception — I. Behavior Research and Therapy 1983; 21 (4): 401 – 408. doi: 10.1016 / 0005-7967 (83) 90009-8.
Neblett R, Hartzell M, Mayer T, Bradford E, Gatchel R. Establishing clinically meaningful levels for the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK-13). Eur J Pain European Journal of Pain 2015; 20 (5): 1 – 10. doi: 10.1002 / ejp.795.

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